You know what’s f****d up?

Walking on the beach to escape the chaos of life…

…Only to see a sand-infested nightmare…

This sand-infested nightmare is like a horror movie scene.

And this horror scene happens every time I go to the beach.

In fact, it happens on every beach everywhere every single day.

Horror movie?

On the beach? Every day?

You heard me right Reader…

Kids and drunk people covered in sand.

Now you might think I’m losing my sh!t over nothing but stick with me here for a minute. And you’ll see there’s a lesson in this beach horror.

Here’s the deal…

Seeing grown-@ss people, wasted, rolling around in the sand, or getting buried up to their necks (like they’re auditioning for the role of a human cactus)…

…Or witnessing kids turn themselves into walking sandcastles…

Drives me up the wall. Full on King Kong level RAGE.

Because when I see people covered in sand…

…It makes me feel like I’m wearing a sand suit.

Think about it…

The feeling of hard grains in your teeth.

The chaffing behind your kneecaps.

And the evil speckled tan that makes you look like a human leopard for a week.

Not to mention the joy of irritation between your armpits and toes.

THE HORROR!

Now before you assume that I’m just complaining…

I will tell you how this “feeling what other people feel” (aka empathy) is one of the most powerful storytelling tricks known to man…

The trick?

Empathetic mirroring.

Empatheta-whoooo?

Let’s digest this term smoothly…

Empathetic mirroring is about getting your reader to feel the same crap you’re describing (without them having to roll in sand).

It’s when you share the emotions or physical states of others.

Example:

SEEING PEOPLE COVERED IN SAND AND FEELING LIKE YOU’RE COVERED IN SAND!

When you see someone cry, you feel like you’re going to cry. Get it?

Here’s how to use empathetic mirroring in your stories…

Notice in the story above I mention all the ways seeing people covered in the sand made me feel? Like:

“The feeling of hard grains in your teeth.”

Everyone has experienced that at some point. But by telling you the sensory feeling of having sand in your teeth it triggers a response in your brain. You’re feeling the same sensation…

So next time you write a story ask yourself:

What did the experience feel like? What did it smell, sound, taste, and look like?

When you hit all of those senses…

…your reader will feel like they’re in the story…

Deeping the relationship between writer and reader.

That’s all for now folks,

Parker “I hate sand” Worth

PS
My best performing X post last week:

PPS
My best-performing LinkedIn post last week:

https://www.linkedin.com/posts/parker-worth-120380270_if-you-want-to-build-an-audience-online-youll-activity-7179839814324604928-6ava

PPPS

My best-performing Thread.net post:

https://www.threads.net/@parkour_worth/post/C4-ooIYuC7C

Hope these help you generate some nifty ideas…